Citizens of Upright Moral Character
'Fair and Balanced'

Gagged, But Not Dead,

This is weeks old, but here it is anyway.

Reprinted here from buzzflash.

[snip]
Those of you who still think this case, my case, is about covering up some administrative blunder or bureaucratic mismanagement, please think again.

Those of you who may think that my Kafkaesque case, the unprecedented secrecy, is due to some justifiable and official higher reasons, please think again.

Those of you who may think that our government, our entrusted leaders, may have an ongoing investigation of the criminals involved, please think again.

The Office of Inspector General for the Department of Justice, in its ‘unclassified report,’ has confirmed my core allegations. What were those core allegations, and who did they involve? Not only some low-level terrorist or terrorist organization; not only some ‘maybe’ critical foreign entities. No; trust me; they would not go to this length to protect some nobody criminal or terrorist.
[snip]


Moral Citizen: evil-barry on May 27, 05 | 12:23 pm | Profile
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COMMENTS

for those who need a little backstory, I found this:

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/10/25/60minutes/main526954.shtml

that is a grim story....


Posted by: pibor on Jun 01, 05 | 1:59 pm

for those who need a little backstory, I found this:

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/10/25/60minutes/main526954.shtml

that is a grim story....


Posted by: pibor on Jun 01, 05 | 2:36 pm

This reminds me of something i read last year. Karen Kwiatkowski, a career Air Force officer, details the culture change that occurred in the Pentagon during the run-up to the Iraq invasion. Highly recommended. Here's a quote and a link (no pswd req):

"From May 2002 until February 2003, I observed firsthand the formation of the Pentagon's Office of Special Plans and watched the latter stages of the neoconservative capture of the policy-intelligence nexus in the run-up to the invasion of Iraq. This seizure of the reins of U.S. Middle East policy was directly visible to many of us working in the Near East South Asia policy office, and yet there seemed to be little any of us could do about it.

I saw a narrow and deeply flawed policy favored by some executive appointees in the Pentagon used to manipulate and pressurize the traditional relationship between policymakers in the Pentagon and U.S. intelligence agencies."

http://www.salon.com/opinion/feature/2004/03/10/osp_moveon/


Posted by: est on Jun 02, 05 | 3:31 pm


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